Should My Child Have Surgery for a Deviated Septum?

A deviated septum can occur in different degrees of severity. While it may seem severe to hear that your child has a deviated septum, there may not be a rush to fix the condition surgically for several more years. Discuss the following symptoms with your pediatrician to see if intervention is necessary in your child’s unique condition.

Breathing

There are several impacts on natural breathing caused by a deviated septum. In some cases, babies and young children are simply unable to breathe at all through the nose. In milder cases, they may have a harder time getting a deep breath through the blocked nostrils. In both cases, it’s likely that your baby will be a “mouth breather.” If this is the case, it will make it very difficult for your little one to eat properly, to remain latched for nursing or to sleep well.

Disfigurement

While a deviated septum is simply a membrane in the nose being out of alignment, there are some cases where the shape and size of the nose makes the baby’s face somewhat disfigured. If the nose is unattractive or disfigured in a dramatic way due to the deviated septum, it may be worthwhile to correct the deformity early on in your child’s life when he will have little or no memory of the surgery and recovery.

Injury

If your child is born with a deviated septum, the severity of the injury will determine what is best in regards to surgery. If your child was injured in the nasal area and now has a deviated septum, surgery to correct the problem may be done very quickly to correct the nose while it is still broken to avoid additional surgery down the road.